INTERACTIVE WEBSITES TO GO ON IF YOU'RE BORED | WEB DESIGN INSPIRATION 2020 | TemplateMonster
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INTERACTIVE WEBSITES TO GO ON IF YOU'RE BORED | WEB DESIGN INSPIRATION 2020 | TemplateMonster



Welcome 8 interactive websites to go on if you’re bored! In this web design inspiration collection, we picked the most interesting websites with gamification elements to entertain you. And if you happen to look for best interactive website templates, visit 👉👉👉 https://www.templatemonster.com/custom/best-interactive-website-templates/?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social

Credits to website owners:
00:04 OMM Experience – http://ommexperience.com/
01:06 The Magicians SYFY – http://www.brakebillsu.com/game
02:08 Heraclos – https://heraclosgame.com/
03:07 Miu Miu – Shift Nudge Landing – https://www.miumiu.com/miumiu-twist/en/
04:14 Wonderful Weekends With Google – https://wonderfulweekends.withgoogle.com/play
05:14 Can’t Unsee – https://cantunsee.space/
06:17 2018 Makemepulse – http://2018.makemepulse.com/
07:12 Let’s Play – http://letsplay.ouigo.com/

#TemplateMonster #WebDesignInspiration #DesignTrends2020

🎵 Max Anson – Night Shuttle https://www.epidemicsound.com/track/jbjHM0wPix
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TOP 5 WEBSITES EVERY WEB DESIGNER SHOULD VISIT: Mind-blowing web design | March 2020
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TOP 5 WEBSITES EVERY WEB DESIGNER SHOULD VISIT: Mind-blowing web design | March 2020



Watch Top 5 Webites for MAY: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g0i-sHKv1aI

Top 5 crazy innovative websites every graphic designer should visit to learn graphic design. These are the best practices, and the best online graphic design websites and web design trends of March 2020

Links Mentioned:
https://www.rouserlab.com/
https://www.ed.com.au/
https://theyearofgreta.com/
https://superherocheesecake.com/
https://useplink.com/en/
https://autumn.amsterdam/
https://5scontent.com/
http://www.amandabraga.com/
https://www.cappen.com/

Learn how to design high-value websites:
http://bit.ly/Flux-Learn-Web-Design

Learn how to build custom websites in hours using Webflow:
http://bit.ly/Flux-Learn-Webflow

Find me on other social media platforms:
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ransegall/
Twitter: http://twitter.com/ransegall
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ran-segall-0b582a33/

Gear & Book Recommendations: http://bit.ly/2ohFOuj

#webdesign #freelancer #webdevelopment

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Web Design Inspiration 2020 / Top 5 Websites That Inspired Me - February 2020
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Web Design Inspiration 2020 / Top 5 Websites That Inspired Me – February 2020



When it comes to the answering the question about where the ideas come from, I always try to amass as much ideas from the designs that inspire me. These are the top 5 websites that inspired me this month.

https://adrienlaurent.fr/

https://neverbland.com/

https://dennisberti.com/

https://harvardfilmarchive.org/

https://1987masters.com/

If you like this video, you can support me by staying connected via social media ⤵

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Codegrid on IG : https://www.instagram.com/codegridweb/
Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/codegridweb/
Codegrid’s Twitter : https://twitter.com/codegridweb/
Website : http://www.codegridweb.com/
Github : https://github.com/codegridweb/

Chat with me and others. Join my Discord : https://discord.gg/Zzpp7Cd

Also, add me on social media and say Hi : https://www.instagram.com/harrnish/

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Web Design Inspiration 2020 / Top 5 Websites That Inspired Me - March 2020
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Web Design Inspiration 2020 / Top 5 Websites That Inspired Me – March 2020



When it comes to answering the question about where the ideas come from, I always try to amass as many ideas from the designs that inspire me. These are the top 5 websites that inspired me this month.

https://mstq.io/

http://www.maria-callas.com/en/

https://tula.redcollar.co/

https://jesperlandberg.dev/

https://fermedutarieu.ca/

If you like this video, you can support me by staying connected via social media ⤵

Find me : https://www.instagram.com/harrnish/
Second YT : https://www.youtube.com/c/harrnish/

Codegrid on IG : https://www.instagram.com/codegridweb/
Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/codegridweb/
Codegrid’s Twitter : https://twitter.com/codegridweb/
Website : http://www.codegridweb.com/
Github : https://github.com/codegridweb/

Chat with me and others. Join my Discord : https://discord.gg/Zzpp7Cd

Also, add me on social media and say Hi : https://www.instagram.com/harrnish/

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Web Design Inspiration 2020 / Top 5 Websites That Inspired Me - April 2020
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Web Design Inspiration 2020 / Top 5 Websites That Inspired Me – April 2020



Check out CODEFLIX: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8UgflNXN_0VHGlO5852WXg

When it comes to answering the question about where the ideas come from, I always try to amass as many ideas from the designs that inspire me. These are the top 5 websites that inspired me this month.

https://www.tplh.net/

https://heycusp.com/

https://stonestyle.co.th/

https://ranlus.fr/

https://helloplayful.com/

If you like this video, you can support me by staying connected via social media ⤵

Find me: https://www.instagram.com/harrnish/
Second YT: https://www.youtube.com/c/harrnish/

Codegrid on IG: https://www.instagram.com/codegridweb/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/codegridweb/
Codegrid’s Twitter: https://twitter.com/codegridweb/
Website: http://www.codegridweb.com/
Github: https://github.com/codegridweb/

Chat with me and others. Join my Discord: https://discord.gg/Zzpp7Cd

Also, add me on social media and say Hi: https://www.instagram.com/harrnish/

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Web Design Inspiration 2020 / Top 5 Websites That Inspired Me - January 2020
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Web Design Inspiration 2020 / Top 5 Websites That Inspired Me – January 2020



When it comes to the answering the question about where the ideas come from, I always try to amass as much ideas from the designs that inspire me. These are the top 5 websites that inspired me this month.

https://www.rezo-zero.com/

http://obys.agency/

https://www.v1.aristidebenoist.com/

https://violenceisnotmyculture.com/

https://www.jomor.design/

If you like this video, you can support me by staying connected via social media ⤵

Find me : https://www.instagram.com/harrnish/
Second YT : https://www.youtube.com/c/harrnish/

Codegrid on IG : https://www.instagram.com/codegridweb/
Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/codegridweb/
Codegrid’s Twitter : https://twitter.com/codegridweb/
Website : http://www.codegridweb.com/
Github : https://github.com/codegridweb/

Chat with me and others. Join my Discord : https://discord.gg/Zzpp7Cd

Also, add me on social media and say Hi : https://www.instagram.com/harrnish/

If you liked the music, check out and follow my playlist on Spotify : https://bit.ly/2_47AM

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5 Surprising Ways to Optimize Websites With Video
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5 Surprising Ways to Optimize Websites With Video




5 Surprising Ways to Optimize Websites With Video









































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Portland Trail Blazers - before
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Your Website’s Navigation Menu Is Costing You Conversions and Here’s What To Do About It


Website menus seem easy.

I wish they were.

In a web usability report from KoMarketing, about half of their respondents reported using the navigation menu to acquaint themselves with a new website.

And 37% of respondents said a poor experience with site navigation was enough of an annoyance to make them want to leave the site completely.

The wrong site menu can actively push people away from your site.

Your menu should always be a reliable cornerstone of your website. Visitors need to know where it is at all times in order to orient themselves and find their way around your site.

A ton of testing has already been done website menus. Luckily, you get to benefit from all those hard won lessons without having to try everything yourself. We’ve broken down the biggest lessons below.

Menu Structure

Although we don’t have any data on what sort of usability issues the Portland Trail Blazers’ website was experiencing, we do know that something prompted them to hire Sq1 to assess their sales funnel and determine what may have potentially been the cause of lackluster sales.

The marketing agency set their sights on the navigation, which was clearly not optimized for the user experience. Here is what it looked like in 2013:

Portland Trail Blazers - before

Portland Trail Blazers – Before

The design itself was difficult to read text from and the layout was confusing. After assessing what visitors’ goals were in using the site’s navigation, Sq1 decided to do a total revamp of the menu’s design and structure.

  • They removed the transparent background.
  • They realigned the drop-down options in a vertical layout, presenting pages in a more logical and easy-to-follow stream.
  • They improved the mobile responsiveness of the menu.

As a result of this A/B test, Sq1 found that the new and improved structure resulted in a 62.9% increase in revenue. The Trail Blazers’ site’s navigation has since undergone a number of renovations, but has maintained the same opaque and vertical layout that proved to be the most effective with their audience from 2014. Here is what it looks like today:

Portland Trail Blazers - after
Portland Trail Blazers – After

Menu Wording

When the designers of the Formstack website set out to tackle the navigation, they initially asked themselves many questions like:

  • What sort of content should appear in the menu?
  • How should we structure it?
  • Which pages should be prioritized in the hierarchy of the menu?

The page they decided to lead their navigation menu with was titled “Why Use Us”. They had high hopes for it as a driver of traffic and conversions and so were consequently surprised when click-through rates failed to meet expectations.

Here is what the Formstack website and “Why Use Us”-led navigation looked like in January of 2013:

Formstack - after

Formstack – Before

Disappointed with the effect their lead page had on visitors, they decided to test a name change to “How It Works”. It was a name they considered prior to launch, but ultimately scrapped for “Why Use Us”. As you can imagine, they were shocked when a simple change of wording in their menu resulted in 50% more page views and 8% more conversions across the website.

It didn’t take long before they ditched the flailing “Why Use Us” wording (which put most of the focus on Formstack) in favor of “How It Works” (which spoke more to an actionable solution). Here is how the site looked in March of that same year after they implemented the change:

Formstack - before

Formstack – After

Menu Logic

Back in 2014, the people behind the Bizztravel Wintersport website began to notice how much work visitors had to do to get around the site to find the destination and vacation that made the most sense for them. With an average of five clicks required to navigate to the correct region (and not even the actual vacation page), they knew there was a serious missed opportunity here.

And so Bizztravel determined that the menu was the greatest source of pain on their site. Lacking in logic and simplicity, they needed to redesign not only the menu, but the header as well, in order to streamline the search process for visitors.

Upon creating an improved and more intuitive navigational system for their site, they launched an A/B test to confirm their hypothesis. What they found was that the redesigned navigation resulted in 21.34% more conversions than the previous navigational design.

This is a side-by-side comparison VWO captured of the old Bizztravel navigation against the new (which still stands today):

Bizztravel before and after

Bizztravel – Before and After

As you can see, the improved navigational system relied on clearer guides—like country flags and other recognizable symbols—to lead visitors down to a more intuitive and helpful interface.

Hidden Menus

When we talk about hidden versus visible menus, what we’re really talking about is whether or not a menu is hidden behind a symbol (like a hamburger menu). While hidden menus may make sense for sites viewed on mobile devices, the question of whether or not these minimal navigational cues can be used on a desktop is something UX experts are indeed curious about.

The Nielsen Norman Group conducted an experiment to try and uncover what exactly happens when you use hidden menus for both desktop and mobile websites. While we don’t have information on which website they tested this on, I don’t know if it’s necessary as the test itself is clear enough.

Can you guess where the hidden menu is on this site?

Impossible Bureau hidden nav

Impossible Bureau Hidden Nav

If you guessed the icon at the center of the page—which logically should only serve as a link back to the homepage—then you would’ve guessed correctly.

In testing visible menus against hidden menus, here is what the NNG researchers found:

Desktop

  • Visitors utilized the hidden menu in 27% of the experiments.
  • When a menu was visible, they used it in 48% of the tests.
  • Hidden menus resulted in people taking a longer time to find their way around a website; specifically, they were 39% slower than those with a visible menu.

Mobile

  • Visitors utilized the hidden menu in 57% of the experiments.
  • When a menu was partially visible and partially hidden (since a fully visible menu isn’t practical on mobile), they used it in 86% of the tests.
  • Hidden menus resulted in navigation being 15% slower than those with a visible menu.

In addition, the researchers also found that hidden menus delayed discoverability. In other words, without a clear guide at the top of the website, users had a more difficult time finding the information they were looking for. Hidden menus led to a 21% increase in difficulty and a 20% decrease in the ability to complete a task.

Here’s a good example of a simple, straightforward, and visible menu:

HostGator visible nav

HostGator Visible Nav

Mobile Menus

As you can see from the example above, mobile users are definitely more acquainted with the hidden menu than desktop users. But when it comes to determining how to design a hidden menu for mobile, it’s not enough to rely on the hamburger icon and call it a day. These tests from Sites for Profit will show you why.

In the first test they conducted, they set out to test the efficacy of the design of the hamburger button. They created three versions of the hidden menu icon:

  • The baseline design which was just the three horizontal lines.
  • The hamburger icon with a thin border around it.
  • The hamburger icon with the word “MENU” beneath it.

What they found was that the icon with the border resulted in a higher conversion rate. Their assumption was that because it more closely resembled a button that visitors’ eyes were drawn to it as something to click.

CaffeineInformer - Hamburger Icon

Caffeine Informer – Hamburger Icon

In the second test they conducted, they wanted to know if the word “MENU” could have a more profound effect when used in other capacities. They created four versions of the hidden menu icon:

  • The baseline design which was just the winning design from the previous test (the hamburger icon with the border).
  • The word “MENU” in place of any icon.
  • The word hamburger icon and the word “MENU” wrapped together inside a thin border.
  • The word “MENU” within a border.

They found that the hamburger/MENU with a border received the most clicks; however, it was the word “MENU” wrapped in a border that had the highest conversion rate.

Caffeine Informer - MENU icon

Caffeine Informer – MENU Icon

Sites for Profit was sure that the word “MENU” was the clear winner over the hamburger icon since a well-known and descriptive word was likely to be more effective in drawing traffic than an icon that most, but not all, people were aware of. So they took the winners of their two tests and conducted one final experiment.

Unsurprisingly, the bordered “MENU” won over the icon.

Additional Tips for Menu Design

So, what have we learned about navigation menus from all these A/B tests? Well, if there’s something that doesn’t seem quite right about how visitors interact with your site, then the navigation is a likely culprit. For something that likely doesn’t take as much thought or planning as, say, your home page design or the wording of a conversion pop-up, it can have a seriously devastating effect on your conversion rate if not properly set up.

Here are some additional tips to keep in mind when designing your website’s menu:

Tip #1

Always link your logo to the home page. According to the KoMarketing report mentioned earlier, 36% of people use it to navigate back to the start.

Despite the multiple menus, search bar, and member links on the REI website, the logo stands out large and in charge so there’s never any question on how visitors can return to the home page.

REI home logo

REI Home Logo

Tip #2

Keep it simple. The more pages you try to jam in a single space, the greater the chance you’re going to confuse someone. So either keep the number of menu options on the lower end of the spectrum (realistically between five and seven) or simplify the layout.

The La Moulade navigation is a great example of this.

La Moulade simplified nav

La Moulade  Simplified Nav

While they could’ve followed other agencies’ leads in breaking out their services into a variety of sub-pages that, frankly, their visitors wouldn’t really understand, they kept it nice and simple. Three pages in the navigation and a fun animated scrolling effect tells visitors everything they need to know about the quality of work they’ll get when working with La Moulade.

Tip #3

Organize your menu based on priority. The serial position effect says that pages that appear closer to the top or bottom will automatically take precedence in your visitors’ minds.

Comedy Central Priority

Comedy Central Priority

As you can see on the Comedy Central site, they’ve chosen not to list their shows in alphabetical order or in any seemingly logical order that would help visitors find what they’re looking for right away. It’s probably safe to assume then that The Daily Show is their highest rated show—or one they want to put in front of more viewers—and that’s why it was given the top slot here.

Tip #4

Use concise, but descriptive menu page titles. This is not the place to try and get creative with headlines.

Tip #5

Build your menus as wide as you can for each screen size. It’ll make the text easier to read and the buttons easier to click.

The Adwyse website does a great job of maximizing the space the menu takes up so that page titles are always large enough to read and click on. This applies both to the desktop navigation:

AdWyse Desktop

Adwyse Desktop

As well as the mobile navigation:

AdWyse Mobile

Adwyse Mobile

Tip #6

Use color or other hover effects to indicate “You Are Here” within the menu. The Netflix website makes good use of their brand red to let visitors know where they’re currently located within the navigation.

Netflix Colors

Netflix Colors

Tip #7

Make your navigation “stick” so visitors don’t worry about where it disappeared to. This applies to any style of navigation, too: mobile or desktop, visible or hidden, horizontal or vertical.

The Coloured Lines’ website does a good job of this with their super colorful, icon-driven, and ever-present vertical navigation:

Coloured Lines Sticky Nav

Coloured Lines Sticky Nav

Tip #8

Mobile and desktop users want a menu that makes sense for them, so don’t try and design one menu to suit all. The Intuit website, surprisingly, serves as the perfect example of why you need to do this.

Here is it on desktop:

Intuit - Desktop

Intuit – Desktop

And here it is on mobile:

Intuit - Mobile

Intuit – Mobile

Either they don’t have any visitors from mobile or they don’t care that they need to pinch and zoom and scroll in order to make their way around the non-responsive website.

Tip #9

When designing a menu for mobile, remember to make it crystal clear that the menu is clickable. A border is a great way to call this out. Here’s how Politico does it:

Politico - boxed hamburger

Politico – Boxed Hamburger

Tip #10

Icons aren’t always universally understood, so try to avoid using them when possible—for mobile or desktop.

I’d suggest that the Brit & Co website actually does a good job of this since the icons they use are all instantly recognizable:

Brit and Co - icons

Brit and Co – Icons

Tip #11

It’s okay to have deep, multi-layer menus. However, never place them within hidden menus. Always use a mega menu design and think about adding breadcrumbs to simplify navigation even further.

The Verizon Wireless website abides by both these rules. First, they’re completely transparent about the information available in their navigation and have done a fantastic job at organizing their mega menu structure.

Verizon Mega Menu

Verizon Mega Menu

Secondly, they include breadcrumbs as visitors dive deeper into their website, helping them backtrack if they need to (which comes in handy for product-heavy sites).

Verizon Breadcrumbs

Verizon Breadcrumbs

Tip #12

If you want to use a creative navigation upon entering the site (think of ones that use scrolling or animation), feel free to do so. But that should be where the creativity ends. Place the main menu in the expected location for the rest of the on-site experience.

A lot of designers are playing with pop-up/slide-out functionality right now since that unexpected movement seems to do really well in capturing visitors’ attention. But pop-ups don’t need to be relegated to urgent messages about special offers, they’re now also being used for navigation, like in the case of Bolden’s menu.

Bolden Popup

Bolden Popup

Just remember that when you’re done flexing your creative muscles, that you place your menu (or hamburger icon) in an easy-to-find and expected location.

Summary

All that said, just because you follow the “rules” of what makes for a good navigation experience, and your instincts tell you that what you’ve done makes sense, that doesn’t always mean your visitors will agree. Anything that deviates from what they expect from your site or that causes undue confusion or frustration could potentially cost you conversions. This is why A/B testing is an absolute must for your navigation.

There are so many factors to consider when A/B testing your navigation. You can start by looking at what the experts have done above, but don’t forget to also think about the number of links, color choice, location, sizing, wording, and more.

Want more help? Check out Crazy Egg’s new guide, “Tools, Tips, and Getting Ready For A/B Testing.

getting started guide to cro

About the Author:

Nathan James Oulman writes around the web on conversions and Web Hosting. He is a real estate agent in Sandpoint, Idaho.

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BEST 11 Money Making Apps, Websites & Tools for Social Media 2020
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BEST 11 Money Making Apps, Websites & Tools for Social Media 2020



Get Apphi Here- https://apphi.com/r/s6ytu

1.) Get my ENTIRE 2020 Reseller + Social Media training program for just $20.20. Includes everything below + VIP group, Accountability, Ebay, Amazon, Poshmark, Accounting & More!!

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How to Interpret and Use Clickmaps to Improve Your Website’s UX
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How to Interpret and Use Clickmaps to Improve Your Website’s UX


How to Interpret and Use Clickmaps to Improve Your Website’s UX

Website clickmaps can offer all kinds of valuable information about your website and the people visiting it. Among other things, a clickmap can tell you:

  • Where individual users click on a page
  • Where on the page users click the most (and least) often
  • How changes to the web page’s copy, design, and more can affect where and how often users click

The trick is, in order to use that information to improve your website’s experience and efficacy, you have to know how to read and interpret what you see on a clickmap.

Let’s back up for a second: What is a clickmap, really? In a nutshell, a clickmap is a visual representation of where website visitors click on a given page of your website, and it typically captures click behavior over a period of time. This type of website user experience (UX) report is also known as a heatmap (which is what we call it here at Crazy Egg).

In this article, we explain more about what you can learn from a clickmap and how to read and understand them (with 3 examples). Then, we share a few of the more advanced ways you can use clickmaps to improve your website’s UX.

Note: Ready to see your clickmaps and get to know your visitors’ click behavior, plus how you can optimize your website for more conversions? Sign up and try Crazy Egg free for 30 days.

What Can You Learn from a Clickmap?

At Crazy Egg, we have 5 reports (called Snapshots) that deal with click behavior of your website visitors:

  • Heatmap Report
  • Scrollmap Report
  • Confetti Report
  • Overlay Report
  • List Report

You can attack your users’ click behavior from a couple different angles with these reports—and learn a few key things along the way.

What You Can Learn from the Heatmap

The Heatmap Report is the standard “clickmap.” It shows you where visitors click on a given webpage or landing page by using different colors to indicate the frequency and number of user clicks.

So, for example, you’d want to see white (which indicates a lot of mouse clicks) on your calls-to-action (CTAs). If your CTA buttons show up blue (which indicates very few clicks) on the heatmap report, that’s a signal that something is stopping visitors from converting.

What You Can Learn from the Confetti Snapshot

Our Confetti Report shows more granular information about individual visitors based on their  click behavior. You can see each individual click represented on the webpage (instead of just an indication of the quantity of clicks). One of the key differences here is that the Confetti report lets you break out 22 different segments and profiles to get a deeper look at who is actually doing all that clicking.

For example, you can look at click behavior for new visitors vs. returning visitors or break it down by the referring page a visitor came from. Our Confetti report also automatically tracks any UTM campaigns you have set up, so you can look at clicks by campaign, too.

Here’s an example of how that breakdown can impact your business: We’ve heard from a few customers who filtered their Confetti snapshots by country, which helped them identify new markets they could target. A year later, those new markets led to 15-16% revenue growth.

What You Can Learn from the Overlay Report

The Overlay Report is similar to the Confetti Report in that it allows you to filter through the clicks on your webpage based on details like new vs. returning visitors, device, UTM campaign, and more. The difference is that the Overlay Report enables you to look into that data, grouped together for each clickable element on the page.

So, for example, you can see whether visitors who landed on your page after searching for a particular keyword in Google click on your CTA at a higher rate than visitors who searched a different keyword.

What You Can Learn from the List Report

Similarly, the List Report shows you the percentage of users who clicked on each clickable element on the webpage. So if your Google Analytics data shows a certain webpage has a high exit rate, you can use the List Report to figure out where those visitors are going.

Here’s another example: If people are clicking to start filling out a form but a large percentage of them aren’t clicking to submit the form, you can use the List Report to identify that. Then, you can use the Overlay Report above to dig into who those visitors are and why they may not be completing the form.

How to Read and Understand Your Clickmaps

In the most basic sense, reading a clickmap is fairly easy. Red means a lot of clicks. Confetti dots equal individual clicks. But, of course, figuring out where and how often visitors click on your webpage isn’t the end-goal, is it?

Clickmaps are valuable because of the conclusions you can draw from the data they show you. And drawing those conclusions starts with anchoring yourself. Why did you create a snapshot on this page to begin with? Was there a datapoint in Google Analytics that you wanted to understand better? What was the ideal journey for your ideal customer after they visit this page?

When you have a sense of what you’re really looking for in a clickmap, it becomes easier to make sense of the colors, dots, and numbers in front of you. Clickmaps show you:

  • Whether or not visitors are following that ideal customer journey—including where they come from to get to a webpage and where they go afterwards.
  • Which elements on a page your ideal customers are engaging with the most.
  • The quality of traffic to a page, in terms of following that ideal customer journey.

Note: Ready to see your Heatmap and get to know your visitors’ click behavior, plus how you can optimize your website for more conversions? Sign up and try Crazy Egg free for 30 days.

Examples of Clickmaps and the Conclusions You Can Draw from Them

To help illustrate all of that, let’s look at a few examples of clickmaps and talk about what you can learn from them and the corresponding actions you might take.

Heatmap Report

Here’s an example of our Heatmap Report on a homepage:

You can see by the tiny blue splotch that there hasn’t been a lot of clicks on the call-to-action (CTA) button—which is the whole point of the page. That tells us something about the button (positioning on the page, color, copy, etc.) isn’t working for their visitors.

Here’s what the Heatmap Report looks like after they tested new copy for the CTA:

You can tell from the report that the new copy compelled a lot more people to click on the CTA.

Confetti Report

Here’s an example of our Confetti Report on an eCommerce webpage:

This snapshot illustrates our Confetti example from above really well—by filtering individual clicks by country, you can see that visitors in India are doing a lot of clicking on CTAs. That could be an indication that India is a potential new market for the business to expand into.

Overlay Report

Here’s an example of our Overlay Report on a blog post:

In the snapshot, we can see that relatively few visitors clicked on the hyperlink “getting higher conversion rates.” Yet quite a few people clicked on the text about “common problems marketers and business owners” face. That tells us that readers of this blog post are more interested in common problems facing people like them than getting higher conversion rates.

With that info, you can keep blog readers engaged and moving through your content by linking to new or existing content on common problems faced by marketers and business owners.

Advanced Ways to Use Clickmaps to Improve Your Website

Once you’ve gotten the hang of reading and interpreting clickmaps, you can start using them in more advanced ways—gleaning more information and more value out of them and further improving website UX, conversion rate, and more.

When you’re ready, here are 3 more advanced ways to use clickmaps:

Track Custom User Variables with Confetti and Overlay Reports

As we covered previously, the Confetti and Overlay reports allow you to dig much deeper into the profile and segments of the users who click on various page elements on your website. And there are countless ways you can filter these users and clicks to get different information.

For example, you can track how the click behavior of users who are logged in compares to the behavior of non-users

For eCommerce, you can look at the click behavior of customers who converted on the webpage versus those who didn’t make a purchase. Most eCommerce websites track this information via cookies and they can pass that info along to Crazy Egg where it gets integrated into your clickmaps.

Add More Context to A/B Tests

If you’re running A/B tests on your website, clickmaps can help add more context to the results you see. Typically, A/B testing software tells you which of two variants was more effective for the pre-set goal (conversions, engagement, etc.).

When you add clickmaps into the mix, you can compare both variants side-by-side and get a sense of how each variation altered click behavior on the page.

Monitor Website UX on an Ongoing Basis

In addition to using clickmaps to track user behavior during—and right after—an A/B or other kind of test, more advanced users use them to monitor click behavior on an ongoing basis. Why? Something can always change—even when you aren’t actively changing or testing a given page.

For example, the ad copy sending visitors to the page might change. If that creates a message mismatch between the ad and the copy on your webpage, that can affect click behavior and conversion rates.

Improve Your Website UX with Clickmaps

Clickmaps and heatmaps are some of the best tools website owners have at their disposal to understand how users interact with their webpages. Now that you know how to read and interpret them, you can take concrete actions that improve your website’s UX, boost your conversion rates, add context to your A/B tests, and more.

Note: Ready to see your Heatmap and get to know your visitors’ click behavior, plus how you can optimize your website for more conversions? Sign up and try Crazy Egg free for 30 days.





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