What’s new
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What’s New for Shopify Partners


Since we last published on this blog, the world has undeniably changed. COVID-19 is impacting how we all live our lives, conduct business, and communicate with each other. It is, and will continue to be, a difficult time as we all learn how to navigate this new reality.

We want to let you know that the editorial team behind Shopify’s Web Design and Development Blog is working hard to reimagine what kind of content would be most helpful to the partner and developer community, right now. We’re aiming to bring you relevant information and education to help you make the right decisions for your business. If you have suggestions for content you’d like to see us cover, please share your idea with us.

Today’s post is a roundup of the most important product updates you need to know to continue your work with clients and users during this time, including API version 2020-04, postponing removal of API version 2019-04 until July 1, COVID-19 resources for partners, and updates to the Partner Program Agreement relating to billing, taxes, and custom and public apps.

If you’d rather receive these updates via email, please sign up for our monthly What’s New with Shopify email below.

Things are tough right now, but we’re a resilient bunch. We’re here to support you, and together, we’ll get through this. Stay safe, and take care of each other.

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Partner updates

Learn more about the platform updates that impact you as a Shopify Partner.

An important update about the removal of API version 2019-04

What’s new: Important update

With COVID-19’s impact on communities around the world, we’ve decided to postpone the removal of API version 2019-04 to July 1, so that you can better focus on helping merchants and other partners in these challenging times. 

This means that on April 1, 2020, the 2020-04 version will become stable and ready for general usage.

Then on July 1, 2020, the following will happen:

  • API versions 2019-04 and 2019-07 will become unsupported.
  • Requests with no API version specified will be served the 2019-10 API version.
  • Requests for the 2019-04 or 2019-07 versions will no longer receive those versions. Instead, these requests will fall forward to 2019-10.
  • Webhooks set to 2019-04 or 2017-07 will fall forward in the same manner.

For those of you who’ve already put in the time and energy to update, we want to say thank you for your diligence and understanding—your efforts haven’t gone to waste. You’re now ahead of the game, and can focus on more pressing matters for your business, clients, and app users.

If you have any questions, come chat with us in the API forums or log in to the Support section of your Partner Dashboard.

Learn more

COVID-19 and Shopify

In the face of COVID-19, we’re taking steps to help support independent businesses, including Shopify Partners, developers, and the merchants you work with. There are a number of resources now available:

Shopify Unite cancelled

While we were excited to host a virtual Shopify Unite this year, and reunite as a community with our partners and developers online, the last two weeks have caused us to re-evaluate. We’ve decided to cancel Shopify Unite to focus on the health of our employees and work closely with our merchants to help them through these challenging times.

If you have any further questions, send your query to [email protected] and we’ll respond as soon as possible.

Impact of Shopify 90-day free trial on partners building stores

Last week, we announced extended 90-day free trials for new Shopify merchants. We’d like to clarify for partners that there will be no impact on recurring commission payments you receive by building Shopify stores for your clients. This means that the default continues to be that merchants referred in through a development store do not automatically get the 90-day free trial, and must pick a paid plan at time of handoff from the partner to the merchant. Partners who build stores for merchants will continue to have unlimited time to work on development stores before transferring them to clients. 

If you are a partner who would like to extend a 90-day free trial to a new merchant requesting it, then please contact partner support before you initiate the transfer of the store to your client by selecting the Store or account management topic on the Contact Partner Support intake form in your Partner Dashboard. By extending this offer to your new client, your recurring commission payments will be delayed by up to 90 days. We will adjust the setting in the development store to reflect that you have agreed to extend this offer to your client. If you reach out to partner support after you have initiated the transfer to your client, then we will not be able to modify your development store to extend the offer to your client. 

Giving store building partners more time to collect recurring commission payments 

These are difficult times for many partners and the merchants who hire them. Under normal circumstances, partners who refer clients to Shopify must refer at least one merchant through a development store or upgrade at least one client to Shopify Plus during a consecutive 12-month period to continue receiving recurring commission payments on previous referrals.

In light of the current economic challenges partners and merchants are facing, we will temporarily pause this requirement. This means all recurring commission payments will continue, and will not reset to zero until the current business climate normalizes. When things do normalize, partners who receive recurring commission payments will have the same amount of time to complete an activity as before. For example, if you currently have 7 months to complete an activity, you will still have 7 months once this pause is lifted. If you refer a new merchant or upgrade a merchant to Shopify Plus during the pause, you’ll have a full 12 months to complete another activity once the pause is lifted. 

Updates to the Partner Program Agreement

On March 3, we updated the Shopify Partner Program Agreement (PPA) to include new definitions of public and custom apps, and to clarify our role as a billing agent. Acting as a billing agent means Shopify is responsible for facilitating payment transactions between partners and merchants who purchase their apps, themes, and services.

PPA updates regarding public and custom apps were effective immediately on March 3, 2020. 

For PPA updates regarding billing and tax status, we’ve provided partners with 90 days notice to assess the potential impact on how they run their businesses. As a result, the billing and tax updates to our PPA will come into effect on June 1, 2020. Partners will begin to see product changes that reflect the billing and tax updates starting June 2020.

Learn more about these new billing and tax updates:

Partners impacted by these updates were notified directly by email and their Partner Dashboard. We encourage all partners and developers to review the PPA.

Review PPA

Instagram API deprecation

Instagram has pushed back the date it will be discontinuing API access in favor of the Basic Display API to March 31, 2020. After this date, any client continuing to use Instagram’s API will stop working. 

As a result, Shopify themes that feature an Instagram feed will no longer be supported, and any Instagram feed on merchant stores will need to be updated. Going forward, including an Instagram feed on your client’s store will require the use of a third-party app.

Browse the Shopify App Store to find an appropriate Instagram feed app.

View apps

Merchant improvements

The following updates are coming into effect for merchants this month. 

  • The free Shopify-built Geolocation app is now available to merchants selling in multiple currencies or languages on Shopify. 
  • Video and 3D models are now available on product pages. You can update themes to include video and 3D, create and edit video and 3D content, and build apps that help with the above.
  • New inventory reports are now available to merchants. These reports help merchants understand how much inventory they have on hand and their inventory costs.
  • There are updates to Shopify Shipping rates for merchants in the U.S. and Canada. Learn more about these new rates.

Stay in the know

That’s all for this month. To stay up to date with changes that impact the Shopify platform and app development, subscribe to the Shopify developer changelog by email or RSS for updates as they happen. Or, sign up to our What’s New with Shopify email below.

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covid 19
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How Shopify Partners are Responding to COVID-19 — Shopify News


In the face of COVID-19, businesses are scaling back operations and pivoting business models in an attempt to limit in-person interactions. While these measures are absolutely necessary, they severely impact small and independent businesses around the world.

That’s why the recent response from the Shopify Partner community is a bright spot in an otherwise challenging time.

Over the past few days, we’ve seen dozens of Shopify Partners lend a (virtual) hand to not only their clients and users, but to any merchant, business owner, and partner who is in need of some help. 

In fact, there are so many examples of partners offering help to their wider communities, both online and in real life, that we’ve been adding examples to this article up until the very last minute. 

We hope these stories inspire you and brighten up your day a little bit, as they have for us. We’ve also included a section on how Shopify is supporting partners and merchants during this time.

Shopify Partners supporting the ecosystem

It’s heartwarming to see how Shopify Partners have offered, without hesitation, help to entrepreneurs of all stripes and in so many different ways. Below, we look at some examples of how partners are pivoting to respond to our current times.

1. Community

The support of a community goes a long way in difficult times. We’ve always known that the community is strong at Shopify, but partners have further proven this by jumping in to assist in whatever ways they can.

One example is Kurt Elster, founder of Shopify consultancy Ethercycle, who is helping amplify ecommerce brands by sharing their stories via Ethercycle’s network and newsletter. 

Virtual meetups are also popping up as partners figure out how to keep in contact with their peers in a time of social distancing.

One example is the partner-run initiative, Women in Shopify Virtual Happy Hour, open to all women involved in the commerce industry and put together in collaboration by Alli Burg from Lucid, Deb Hopkins from Causeway305, and Kelly Vaughn from The Taproom Agency. The happy hour is being hosted via Zoom on Wednesday, March 25th at 6:00PM EST. Registration is via their landing page.

covid 19: women in shopify
The Women in Shopify Virtual Happy Hour.

App developer Privy is helping buyers connect with small businesses by sharing their recommendations and favorite products. Founder Ben Jabbawy shared businesses that his family is relying on during this time.

Additionally, Privy announced it will launch a marketplace for small ecommerce brands next week to help make it easier for buyers to support independent online businesses.

Shopify app developers Inventory Planner are also supporting small and medium sized businesses by sharing advice specifically around cash flow to help merchants prepare for any slowdowns.

Partners are also making an effort to gather and share relevant data with other partners.

Shopify app developer and email marketing platform Klaviyo is launching a daily survey to collect feedback on what ecommerce brands are seeing in the reality of COVID-19. They’re sharing their learnings every morning at 9:00AM EST on their Twitter. The information being shared there could be good context to share with your own clients and users.

Additionally, Bold Commerce, a Shopify app development agency, is collecting all offers of help from Shopify Partners and sharing with their wider user-base. Their co-founder Jason Myers posted a call to action in the Shopify Partners Facebook group.

covid 19: bold

In times like these, seeing Shopify Partners of all kinds come together to weather unprecedented circumstances is nothing short of incredible. 

2. Education

Shopify Partners are also stepping forward with educational resources to help equip entrepreneurs—including partners and merchants—with the insights they need to find long term success.

One of these partners is Jordan Deutsch, co-founder of digital studio Up at Five. Up at Five creates Shopify development tutorials at Code Shopify, and are currently offering their courses for free.

These courses are designed for those who are already familiar with coding, and who want to learn how to jump into Shopify app development or theme development.

In lieu of a fee, Up at Five is asking those who can to donate to a local charity or purchase a gift certificate from a small business. This educational content can support partners looking to expand their offering to clients, or help folks who are out of work get more familiar with Shopify.

Shopify agency Blend Commerce is also offering education, in the form of a guide on how merchants can navigate COVID-19.

covid 19: blend

With guidance on marketing, functionality, and more, this resource will help existing merchants prepare for what’s to come.

3. Consultations and advice

Now more than ever, entrepreneurs are looking for guidance from experienced ecommerce experts on how to navigate uncertain times. This is a need Shopify Partners are uniquely positioned to respond to.

Rhian Beutler, COO and co-founder of Shopify agency Venntov, is doing just that by offering SEO and business strategy consultations.

Shopify design studio Up Later Than You is also offering consultation services, specifically with email subject lines. As merchants double down on reengaging existing customers and encouraging customer loyalty, crafting an effective subject line can help them stand out in crowded inboxes.

4. Store setup

For many entrepreneurs around the world, circumstances are forcing them to rethink their business plans. Many retail businesses will consider moving more of their business online as storefronts shut their physical doors, and many others, such as restaurants and bars, will start to pivot and reimagine their business models altogether.

Kelly Vaughn, founder of Shopify agency The Taproom Agency, is offering to help brick and mortar stores get up and running on Shopify—even if all they can sell at this time is gift cards, as is the case for many food establishments.

Support for partners and merchants

As the situation continues to evolve, we’ll be coming out with more partner resources, updated tools, and guides. We ask that partners continue to monitor the developer changelog and the Web Design and Development Blog in the coming weeks to keep up to date.

It’s important to note that the API version removal that was scheduled for April 1, 2020 will now be postponed to July 1, 2020 due to COVID-19. Learn more by reading our blog post on the topic.

At this time, we’re also collecting government assistance programs around the world. These programs may apply to your clients, or to your own business. We’ll continue updating this as more measures are announced. Shopify has also launched a page that highlights the steps we’re taking to support Shopify merchants during COVID-19. This hub will be continuously updated, and is a good resource to share with your users and clients.

We’ve included a few content selections from Shopify’s partner and ecommerce blogs that may help make your day-to-day in this new reality a little easier. These include:

Shopify Meetups have transitioned into digital meetups, with partner hosts developing programming that will enable both merchants and fellow partners to connect online (if you’re interested in getting involved, email us at [email protected]). The landing page for meetups has also been converted into a digital library of live sessions from around the world—be sure to check them out.

Additionally, there are a number of other ways you can connect with the rest of the Shopify Partner community, and access further guidance and support:

We’re committed to providing more partner programming in the coming weeks that allows the community to connect and learn from one another—stay tuned. 

Working together

As we all work together to pivot and help support our merchants through this difficult time, we’re also supporting each other and the wider Shopify ecosystem. Take care of each other.

Are you offering help or resources during COVID-19? Let us know how in the comments below.





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Simplified Shopify reporting in your Buffer dashboard
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Simplified Shopify reporting in your Buffer dashboard


One thing we’ve heard over and over is that logging into social media analytics tools can leave marketers feeling a little lost. Sure you can see the reach and engagement of your posts but how is this really impacting your business?

Social media tools have been great at giving us social media metrics. But they terribly lack at providing us with a comprehensive view of the business. Unless you are running social ads, chances are you find it hard to know how your marketing efforts have influenced sales.

For direct-to-consumer (DTC) brands that invest in social media, the need to understand how social media and sales relate to each other is crucial. Marketers at these brands need to know how their social media strategy is helping the business. To them, social media is not just about getting likes and comments…

but how their social media posts are driving the business forward.

That’s why we are thrilled to introduce the first version of our Shopify integration today. You can now have your social and Shopify data in one single tool and create modern, visual reports with more data about your business. 

(Can’t wait to get started? Start an Analyze Premium trial to try the integration right away!)

Realize the full potential of your brand

Our customers use our platform of products to build their brand and connect with their customers online. Analyze, our new analytics product, aims to help you realize the full potential of your brand.

To achieve the best version of your brand, we want to give you:

  • More data to provide a more complete picture of your brand
  • Data that are easy to understand and share
  • Strategies and tactics to achieve your goals

Currently, social media marketing can feel isolated from the business. You spend time creating content, find the best time to post, and respond to questions on your posts. At the end of the day, you can only report on follower growth, reach, and engagement.

Only if you had more data about your marketing efforts and the business!

When we look at 1,300 top DTC brands, we learned that 87.4 percent of them use Shopify to sell their products.

Shopify provides data that marketers and small business owners often lack in social media tools — sales data. We realized it’s a source of data that could give you a more complete picture of your brand:

Social + sales

Simplified Shopify reporting in your Buffer dashboard

“We usually cross reference metrics from Shopify and our social media analytics.”

When we asked our customers how they figure out whether what they are doing on social is worth it, we heard several versions of the quote above. That’s when we realized our customers have a problem we could solve.

With the new Shopify integration, you’ll have your social media and Shopify data in a single place — Analyze. For this first version, we focus on a few key metrics you need and put them in the same dashboard as your social media data.

At the top of your Shopify tab, you can get a quick health check-in on your business. This is built for you to get a sense of your business health at a glance.

One of the metrics you’ll get is your average customer lifetime value. This is an important metric to know because to have a profitable business, you generally want to spend less money on acquiring new customers and retaining them than they spend on your products.

You’ll also get data to help you understand where your sales are coming from and what products are selling well.

Which channel drives the most number of customers or the highest sales?

Which channel brings in the most valuable customers?

Which are my top products, and where are the sales coming from?

This additional data from Shopify in Analyze will give you a better picture of your business than having only social media data.

To make it easier for your reporting, you can add the tables to your reports in Analyze, download them as PDF, and share them with your team. Just like any other tables and charts in Analyze.

Connecting social media and sales

For a long time, marketers have struggled to show the impact of social media on the bottom line. Much of this data is not available in social media tools that marketers use to plan, optimize, and report their campaigns. It just felt off that marketers can plan and measure their social media campaigns in one tool but have to find another, often much more complicated, tool to know that the campaigns are selling products.

Now you can report how much sales your social media marketing strategy has generated for the business — using a single tool.

(These numbers do not include orders from customers who saw your social media posts and went to Google to search for your website and buy products. That is much harder to track right now. But you now know, at the minimum, how much sales came directly from your social media profiles and the actual impact is much higher.)

You no longer need to jump between tools to draw the connection between your social media efforts and your sales.

Hannah Pilpel, social project manager at MADE.COM, discovered that customers from organic social have a higher average order value than the site average. You can now see this for your business, too.

Gain a better understanding of your brand

Having more data and analytics is essential for realizing the full potential of your brand. It gives you insights to act on and improve your marketing campaigns so that you can grow your brand and your business.

This is just the first version of our Shopify integration, and we are keen to explore more ways to make it more valuable to you. For example, here are some of the areas we have been thinking about:

  • Per-post sales: Find out how much sales each social media post has generated
  • Campaign sales: Know how much sales your campaign has generated
  • Customer insights: Learn more about the social media users who are buying your products
  • Customer lifetime value: Calculate customer lifetime value for different segments
  • Product buzz: Get insights into who’s talking about your products on social

For now, with your social media and Shopify data together in Analyze, you can already have a better understanding of your marketing and brand.

Give yourself an advantage today.

Try Analyze for free.





This content was originally published on Source link, we are just re-sharing it.

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Simplified Shopify reporting in your Buffer dashboard
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Simplified Shopify reporting in your Buffer dashboard


One thing we’ve heard over and over is that logging into social media analytics tools can leave marketers feeling a little lost. Sure you can see the reach and engagement of your posts but how is this really impacting your business?

Social media tools have been great at giving us social media metrics. But they terribly lack at providing us with a comprehensive view of the business. Unless you are running social ads, chances are you find it hard to know how your marketing efforts have influenced sales.

For direct-to-consumer (DTC) brands that invest in social media, the need to understand how social media and sales relate to each other is crucial. Marketers at these brands need to know how their social media strategy is helping the business. To them, social media is not just about getting likes and comments…

but how their social media posts are driving the business forward.

That’s why we are thrilled to introduce the first version of our Shopify integration today. You can now have your social and Shopify data in one single tool and create modern, visual reports with more data about your business. 

(Can’t wait to get started? Start an Analyze Premium trial to try the integration right away!)

Realize the full potential of your brand

Our customers use our platform of products to build their brand and connect with their customers online. Analyze, our new analytics product, aims to help you realize the full potential of your brand.

To achieve the best version of your brand, we want to give you:

  • More data to provide a more complete picture of your brand
  • Data that are easy to understand and share
  • Strategies and tactics to achieve your goals

Currently, social media marketing can feel isolated from the business. You spend time creating content, find the best time to post, and respond to questions on your posts. At the end of the day, you can only report on follower growth, reach, and engagement.

Only if you had more data about your marketing efforts and the business!

When we look at 1,300 top DTC brands, we learned that 87.4 percent of them use Shopify to sell their products.

Shopify provides data that marketers and small business owners often lack in social media tools — sales data. We realized it’s a source of data that could give you a more complete picture of your brand:

Social + sales

Simplified Shopify reporting in your Buffer dashboard

“We usually cross reference metrics from Shopify and our social media analytics.”

When we asked our customers how they figure out whether what they are doing on social is worth it, we heard several versions of the quote above. That’s when we realized our customers have a problem we could solve.

With the new Shopify integration, you’ll have your social media and Shopify data in a single place — Analyze. For this first version, we focus on a few key metrics you need and put them in the same dashboard as your social media data.

At the top of your Shopify tab, you can get a quick health check-in on your business. This is built for you to get a sense of your business health at a glance.

One of the metrics you’ll get is your average customer lifetime value. This is an important metric to know because to have a profitable business, you generally want to spend less money on acquiring new customers and retaining them than they spend on your products.

You’ll also get data to help you understand where your sales are coming from and what products are selling well.

Which channel drives the most number of customers or the highest sales?

Which channel brings in the most valuable customers?

Which are my top products, and where are the sales coming from?

This additional data from Shopify in Analyze will give you a better picture of your business than having only social media data.

To make it easier for your reporting, you can add the tables to your reports in Analyze, download them as PDF, and share them with your team. Just like any other tables and charts in Analyze.

Connecting social media and sales

For a long time, marketers have struggled to show the impact of social media on the bottom line. Much of this data is not available in social media tools that marketers use to plan, optimize, and report their campaigns. It just felt off that marketers can plan and measure their social media campaigns in one tool but have to find another, often much more complicated, tool to know that the campaigns are selling products.

Now you can report how much sales your social media marketing strategy has generated for the business — using a single tool.

(These numbers do not include orders from customers who saw your social media posts and went to Google to search for your website and buy products. That is much harder to track right now. But you now know, at the minimum, how much sales came directly from your social media profiles and the actual impact is much higher.)

You no longer need to jump between tools to draw the connection between your social media efforts and your sales.

Hannah Pilpel, social project manager at MADE.COM, discovered that customers from organic social have a higher average order value than the site average. You can now see this for your business, too.

Gain a better understanding of your brand

Having more data and analytics is essential for realizing the full potential of your brand. It gives you insights to act on and improve your marketing campaigns so that you can grow your brand and your business.

This is just the first version of our Shopify integration, and we are keen to explore more ways to make it more valuable to you. For example, here are some of the areas we have been thinking about:

  • Per-post sales: Find out how much sales each social media post has generated
  • Campaign sales: Know how much sales your campaign has generated
  • Customer insights: Learn more about the social media users who are buying your products
  • Customer lifetime value: Calculate customer lifetime value for different segments
  • Product buzz: Get insights into who’s talking about your products on social

For now, with your social media and Shopify data together in Analyze, you can already have a better understanding of your marketing and brand.

Give yourself an advantage today.

Try Analyze for free.





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All Growth Hacking Articles

Api deprecation
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What You Need to Know — Shopify API


Before we introduced API versioning at Shopify in April 2019, apps could only interact with the latest and greatest form of our APIs. As we released features to merchants, the APIs tied to these features also evolved, and apps had to quickly adapt to the new way of doing things to ensure they kept working.

This developer experience was not ideal. It wasn’t obvious how to find out if your app would break on any given day, and these changes would totally overtake your own development roadmaps. To solve this, we introduced API versioning to provide stability and a scheduled cadence to our releases.

As we near the one-year mark of shipping versioning, let’s review how it all works, and what you need to look out for in 2020.

How versioning works

To get started, let’s recap the fundamentals of API versioning at Shopify.

1. We release a version every quarter

Typically, these releases happen on or around January 1st, April 1st, July 1st, and October 1st. Versions are named in a year-month format (eg. 2020-01), ensuring that it will always be easy to identify the time the version became stable, as well as compare the timelines of multiple versions.

Api deprecation: Graph of the API versioning schedule
The API versioning schedule.

2. Apps make requests to a specific version of the API by specifying it in the request URL

While the Shopify APIs continuously evolve, apps can choose a stable version to build on to ensure that the API contract remains constant. Keep in mind that this means that any features released after your targeted version won’t be accessible until you update your request URL.

3. We release features to merchants continuously

To ship features without affecting the latest stable APIs, we use the concept of the release candidate. The release candidate is simply the next API version, and can be targeted for requests using the same year-month format. In it, you’ll find the latest set of features that have just been released. Since the release candidate is continuously evolving, you should avoid using it for your app’s general everyday consumption of the API. 

To have both the benefit of stability and access to the latest features, we recommend keeping your app’s everyday requests on a stable version, and that you only move specific calls that deal with newly released features to the release candidate.

4. Apps that do not request a specific version are served the oldest supported version

This allows existing apps to continue functioning when we shipped versioning, without having to update to the new URLs. This concept also applies to apps explicitly calling versions that are no longer supported. 

For example, if your app continues to request 2019-04 after it has become unsupported, you will be served the oldest supported version, which would be 2019-07.

5. Versions are supported for one year

Removing support for versions allows us to stay agile and make the changes needed to best serve our merchants and the Shopify platform for the long term. While versions are supported for 1 year, this means that apps actually only have 9 months to adopt these new changes and take advantage of new features before the old behavior is no longer available.

Now that we’ve gone over the basics of how API versioning works at Shopify, let’s review some key information you need to know for 2020.

You might also like: How to Get More App Downloads in the Shopify App Store.

Unsupported versions

The timing of this post is no coincidence. As we near the one-year mark since we introduced versioning, we’re also approaching the first time we’ll make a version of our API unsupported. 

This means that on April 1, 2020, the following changes will come into effect on our APIs:

  • The 2019-04 version will become unsupported.
  • Requests with no API version specified will be served the 2019-07 API version.
  • Requests for the 2019-04 version will no longer receive 2019-04. Instead, these requests will fall forward to 2019-07.
  • Webhooks set to 2019-04 will fall forward in the same manner.
  • The 2020-04 version will become stable and ready for general usage.

Most importantly, the 2019-07 API version, which will become the default version, includes breaking API changes. If your app is making requests that would break in 2019-07, you need to take action and migrate those requests before April 1, 2020. Failure to do so will result in failed requests and a broken app. 

To minimize merchant impact, if your apps continue to use unsupported APIs after April 1, Shopify may notify merchants that your apps are no longer supported. In some cases, we may de-list apps from the Shopify App Store.

Let’s dive into each of the breaking changes introduced in 2019-07.

Breaking changes

Below are each of the breaking changes being introduced in April. If your app uses any of the below, you’ll want to update to avoid your app breaking.

1. Pagination

Page-based pagination has been removed, and has been replaced with cursor-based pagination.

You can read more about relative pagination in this great blog post.

The takeaway: Stop using the page parameter. Use page_info instead.

2. Featured field removed from Collects

The featured field was removed from the collects endpoint.

Even if you aren’t using this specific field, REST returns everything by default. Because of this, you’ll receive notifications about this deprecation when using the collect endpoint. 

The takeaway: Update your request URL to API version 2019-07 or later. 

3. GraphQL Admin ID added to webhooks

We added the graphql_admin_id to webhook payloads, to make it easier to make GraphQL calls in response, and to be more consistent with our REST payloads. This caused issues in older versions of Rails apps. Even if you aren’t using Rails, it’s good practice to periodically keep your webhook API version up to date to ensure your payloads don’t change when your current version becomes unsupported.

The takeaway: Update your webhook API version to API version 2019-07 or later.

Stay on top of changes

Knowing about upcoming changes is a good start, but in many cases, it can be difficult to identify individual breaking requests within your whole app. To help narrow these down, we’ve introduced the following tools that automatically generate data based on your API usage.

1. API Health

Your Partner Dashboard contains a per-app API Health report, which showcases the exact changes that will affect you. In it, you’ll find the specific endpoints, links to migration guides, and last detected timestamps of deprecated requests. 

2. Deprecation headers

Within your app, you should also monitor incoming changes by logging the presence of the X-Shopify-API-Deprecated-Reason header. This header is added to requests that are deprecated and that will be unsupported within 9 months. You should update your request as per the link returned in the header.

3. Email

Every app has an associated emergency developer email that we use to notify you about pending deprecations. In these emails, you’ll find information that is very similar to the API Health report. Since private apps aren’t associated with a partner account, this is the main way these types of apps have of being notified about changes that will affect them.

Get ready for April 1, 2020

We recognize that every change we bring to the platform is an effort we’re asking of our partners. With versioning, we’ve hopefully made that process more predictable, and a little less chaotic. 

This April, ensure your apps are ready for our first-ever version deprecation, where we bid farewell to 2019-04, and where 2019-07 will become the oldest supported version. 

Check out the 2019-07 release notes for the full set of changes, or your Partner Dashboard to see which changes affect you.



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CSS grid framework
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A CSS Grid Framework for Shopify Collection Pages — Shopify Theme Development


CSS Grid has become an increasingly popular technique for applying a layout to pages amongst other CSS frameworks. Developers can take advantage of this system to reduce complexity and define clear style rules. As we saw previously with our article on getting started with a CSS grid layout, a CSS Grid framework can be easily implemented on Shopify themes to design responsive page layouts based on rows and columns.

All pages of a Shopify online store can adopt CSS Grid, but one obvious touchpoint of any ecommerce site that can benefit from a robust and clean grid layout is the collection page. On collection pages, it feels natural that products are organized in a grid format, with rows and columns. So, if an option for creating a robust grid arrangement with a simple set of rules is possible, it’s worth exploring for your custom theme projects.

In this article, we’ll be looking at how to set up a grid layout for products on your collection pages, and how to use Shopify’s section settings to create customizable options in the online store editor. To get an idea of how this could look for your clients and so you can follow along with this CSS Grid tutorial, I’ve set up a test store which you can use to see the approach I’ve outlined in this tutorial. 

Creating a basic collection page layout 

Working with CSS Grid on a Shopify collection page will operate in very much the same way as how Grid works on a custom section—something we explored in CSS grid blog article. Thankfully, Shopify has excellent CSS grid support. The biggest difference when implementing a grid system on a collection page is that you won’t need to assign a class to each individual item. Note that if you aren’t extremely advanced with CSS, we recommend you read over our intro to CSS guide before going further.

Now, since products are automatically outputted in a loop as repeatable content items, it’s possible to apply the same class to all products that are associated with a collection. But first, let’s look at an example of a collection page with no styling. 

If you start off with a basic collection page setup, you’d likely have markup that looks like the following:

This will output the collection name as a header, and display the collection’s associated products with their image, name, and price. Without any styling, these products will appear in a vertical row by default. The size of the product images will be 300 pixels, as defined by the img_url filter.

To apply a CSS Grid framework to this group of products, you’ll first want to wrap the collection for loop in one main grid container, which is considered the parent container. Next, you can wrap the code for each individual product (the children) within its own individual container. 

Once these containers are added, the markup would appear as:

You might also like: A Beginner’s Guide to Sass with Shopify.

Applying the CSS Grid framework styling to the collection page 

Now that we have a basic collection page with a hierarchy of containers, you can divide the products into a grid layout by applying styles to the classes you’ve created. In the themes stylesheet file, you can add the following: 

Now, when you navigate to the collection page, you should see the products appearing in a grid, fitting into the available space on the screen. 

CSS grid framework: product grid example

As well as adding display: grid, you’ll notice we’re also using the grid-template-columns property, which can be used to define how many columns appear within the grid. Instead of defining a fixed value, we can use the repeat notation to create a rule that our products should appear as many times as they can fit inside the Grid.

Within the functional notation, auto-fit is displaying as many items on the line as possible, so on a full screen, we will see as many products appearing as there is space on the buyers screen. Finally, with minmax, we set up a rule that each cell should be a minimum of 300 pixels, and a maximum of one fraction of the grid-container.

When using this property, we need to ensure that the size defined in the minmax function matches, or is larger than, the size defined by the img_url Liquid filter in our markup. If the minmax function contains a smaller pixel size, you’ll see that product images become cut off as they won’t have enough space within the defined cell. 

Once our basic grid is appearing as expected, we can add additional CSS to tidy up the layout by adding margin space and positioning the products on the center of the page. If you’d like the gap between your columns and rows to be the same, you can define both with the grid-gap property, rather than defining each separately.

Once this is all set up, your stylesheet will look like this: 

While this is a simple example of how a CSS Grid framework can be applied to a collection page, I’d recommend that you experiment with different parameters to suit your client’s images and existing brand imagery. You can also use this approach to create grids on other pages, like the cart and adjust based on its unique characteristics. 

You might also like: How to Add a Social Media Marketing Icon to Your Theme.

Adding customizable grid options

The above approach works well for a grid that will display columns of products based on the size of the screen. But, what if you want to give the merchant some control over how the grid is represented?

In some cases your clients may want to customize the product page, and dictate how many products appear.

If your markup is contained in a section file, you can create section settings that will allow clients to customize the grid from the online store editor. A configuration of settings that allows your client to select a number of products on a row could look like this:

You can see here that the setting has a type of select which will output a drop down option on the online store editor. There is also a label property to describe the setting. 

The id property will not be visible on the editor, but we can reference this to create a variable. A common use-case for variables created with section objects is to reference them within the markup to change class names based on what settings are selected. 

To achieve this effect, we can use Liquid to output the value that is selected on the online store editor, as an attribute of the section object. This object will be expressed as {{ section.settings.product_number }}, and will output whichever value is the selected option.

One way of looking at it is that the id we assigned in the section setting becomes a “placeholder” for the value in the selected option. 

Then, we can take this object and append it to the class name of the collection. This will allow the class name to change based on the selected option, and you can create different CSS rules for each class name. 

When we append the variable to the existing collection class name it will look like:

<div class="grid-collection-{{ section.settings.product_number }}">

Here you can see that the section object references the id of the section setting. The value that is outputted by this section object is determined by the value selected on the online store editor. For example, if “three” is selected on our drop down box, this would cause the markup to output as:

<div class="grid-collection-three">

Now we can move back to our stylesheet and set up different CSS rules for grid-collection-two, grid-collection-three, and grid-collection-four. These would look like:

The grid-template-columns property determines how many columns will appear within the grid, and as a result, how many products will appear in a row on the collection page. So, each class will have a different value for the grid-template-columns property, that corresponds with its unique class name.

Now when a client navigates to the online store editor and selects an option for “Number of products per row”, the grid will adjust to reflect this:

CSS grid framework: grid edit gif

Finally, we can add media queries so that there are different CSS Grid rules for smaller screens. This will avoid the grid appearing with too many columns of products on smaller devices, which would result in products appearing off-screen. 

Each variation of the collection-grid class can be assigned different rules where the grid will drop to two or one columns. When this is set up on your stylesheet, it could look like this:

It’s likely that you’ll need to adjust the pixel sizes and values for the img_url filter based on the specific requirements of your client and the images they’re using. However, this method will show you how to get started using a CSS Grid system for collection pages on your own custom theme builds. 

You might also like: An Overview of Liquid: Shopify’s Templating Language.

Expanding the Grid

Once you’ve applied a CSS Grid to your collection pages, you can start to consider other areas on your Shopify themes where robust website layouts may apply. As an example, it’s possible to create image gallery sections in a grid, and add irregular shaped cells for variety. 

There are a range of opportunities when using CSS Grid on Shopify, and each one potentially adds further value to your theme projects. With the help of this article, you can expand the CSS Grid framework to all of your theme projects.



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Simplified Shopify reporting in your Buffer dashboard
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Simplified Shopify reporting in your Buffer dashboard


One thing we’ve heard over and over is that logging into social media analytics tools can leave marketers feeling a little lost. Sure you can see the reach and engagement of your posts but how is this really impacting your business?

Social media tools have been great at giving us social media metrics. But they terribly lack at providing us with a comprehensive view of the business. Unless you are running social ads, chances are you find it hard to know how your marketing efforts have influenced sales.

For direct-to-consumer (DTC) brands that invest in social media, the need to understand how social media and sales relate to each other is crucial. Marketers at these brands need to know how their social media strategy is helping the business. To them, social media is not just about getting likes and comments…

but how their social media posts are driving the business forward.

That’s why we are thrilled to introduce the first version of our Shopify integration today. You can now have your social and Shopify data in one single tool and create modern, visual reports with more data about your business. 

(Can’t wait to get started? Start an Analyze Premium trial to try the integration right away!)

Realize the full potential of your brand

Our customers use our platform of products to build their brand and connect with their customers online. Analyze, our new analytics product, aims to help you realize the full potential of your brand.

To achieve the best version of your brand, we want to give you:

  • More data to provide a more complete picture of your brand
  • Data that are easy to understand and share
  • Strategies and tactics to achieve your goals

Currently, social media marketing can feel isolated from the business. You spend time creating content, find the best time to post, and respond to questions on your posts. At the end of the day, you can only report on follower growth, reach, and engagement.

Only if you had more data about your marketing efforts and the business!

When we look at 1,300 top DTC brands, we learned that 87.4 percent of them use Shopify to sell their products.

Shopify provides data that marketers and small business owners often lack in social media tools — sales data. We realized it’s a source of data that could give you a more complete picture of your brand:

Social + sales

Simplified Shopify reporting in your Buffer dashboard

“We usually cross reference metrics from Shopify and our social media analytics.”

When we asked our customers how they figure out whether what they are doing on social is worth it, we heard several versions of the quote above. That’s when we realized our customers have a problem we could solve.

With the new Shopify integration, you’ll have your social media and Shopify data in a single place — Analyze. For this first version, we focus on a few key metrics you need and put them in the same dashboard as your social media data.

At the top of your Shopify tab, you can get a quick health check-in on your business. This is built for you to get a sense of your business health at a glance.

One of the metrics you’ll get is your average customer lifetime value. This is an important metric to know because to have a profitable business, you generally want to spend less money on acquiring new customers and retaining them than they spend on your products.

You’ll also get data to help you understand where your sales are coming from and what products are selling well.

Which channel drives the most number of customers or the highest sales?

Which channel brings in the most valuable customers?

Which are my top products, and where are the sales coming from?

This additional data from Shopify in Analyze will give you a better picture of your business than having only social media data.

To make it easier for your reporting, you can add the tables to your reports in Analyze, download them as PDF, and share them with your team. Just like any other tables and charts in Analyze.

Connecting social media and sales

For a long time, marketers have struggled to show the impact of social media on the bottom line. Much of this data is not available in social media tools that marketers use to plan, optimize, and report their campaigns. It just felt off that marketers can plan and measure their social media campaigns in one tool but have to find another, often much more complicated, tool to know that the campaigns are selling products.

Now you can report how much sales your social media marketing strategy has generated for the business — using a single tool.

(These numbers do not include orders from customers who saw your social media posts and went to Google to search for your website and buy products. That is much harder to track right now. But you now know, at the minimum, how much sales came directly from your social media profiles and the actual impact is much higher.)

You no longer need to jump between tools to draw the connection between your social media efforts and your sales.

Hannah Pilpel, social project manager at MADE.COM, discovered that customers from organic social have a higher average order value than the site average. You can now see this for your business, too.

Gain a better understanding of your brand

Having more data and analytics is essential for realizing the full potential of your brand. It gives you insights to act on and improve your marketing campaigns so that you can grow your brand and your business.

This is just the first version of our Shopify integration, and we are keen to explore more ways to make it more valuable to you. For example, here are some of the areas we have been thinking about:

  • Per-post sales: Find out how much sales each social media post has generated
  • Campaign sales: Know how much sales your campaign has generated
  • Customer insights: Learn more about the social media users who are buying your products
  • Customer lifetime value: Calculate customer lifetime value for different segments
  • Product buzz: Get insights into who’s talking about your products on social

For now, with your social media and Shopify data together in Analyze, you can already have a better understanding of your marketing and brand.

Give yourself an advantage today.

Try Analyze for free.





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Shopify slideshow
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How to Combat Image Cropping on Shopify Slideshow Sections — Shopify Theme Development


Here at Shopify, we’ve recently been testing different UX patterns to enhance the popular slideshow section in Shopify-built themes, without compromising what’s unique about their design—no matter if they have a fixed width, extend to the full browser window, or fill the entire viewport. Informed by user testing and support analysis, our updates aim to comply with what’s generally considered today as UX best practices, as well as higher accessibility standards. Along the way, we’ve learned some interesting things.

Having addressed our own support debt through research and design exploration, it seemed only natural to share our insights with our partners. In this article, we share the context of what inspired us to take the approach we did with slideshows. Feel free to have a look under the hood of our themes to replicate the same tactics we came to implement, or try something completely different.

But first, let’s address an observed merchant pain point with slideshows: image cropping.

The problem of image cropping

image cropping negatively affects some themes
Image cropping causes frustration to many merchants, and affects several themes.

A common theme customization request from merchants is to ensure images don’t appear cut off on slideshow sections. It’s very difficult for merchants to deal with both mobile and desktop image ratios when they’re drastically different. 

A quick look at the nicely crafted demo shops in the Shopify Theme Store demonstrates that such design can be successful in many cases. Yet a majority of merchants expect more from their theme and simply have a hard time finding images that are optimized for both contexts. 

Although not exclusive to the slideshow section, this frustration amplifies when merchants have invested time and money in photoshoots which they can’t easily leverage in the prime estate of their homepage. This is especially problematic with (but not limited to) full screen slideshows. 

Many themes in the theme store enable merchants to upload multiple image versions, each optimized for desktop, mobile, and sometimes even tablet. This strategy is valid, but has the downside of an extra time spent with external image editing tools and a multiplication of files to manage afterwards. It’s also not uncommon to find separate settings for desktop and mobile heights. 

You might also like: 5 Ways to Improve Store Loading Times with Minification.

A new solution

We’re making the bet that another approach, relying on a single image upload, can work too, and we tackled the problem from a different angle, or rather two angles:layout options and image position settings. Below, we dive into how both these solutions work.

Shopify slideshow: desktop vs. mobile hero images
Perfect hero images on desktop sometimes turn out to be not so perfect when viewed on mobile.

1. Layout options

A challenge inherent to slideshows is that slides may contain images with different ratios. When this is the case, providing solutions to completely avoid cropping comes with trade-offs. 

Adapting the section’s height per slide is not something we recommend. We tested different variations of a slideshow that dynamically adapted its height to one image regardless of the screen size, combined with further image display options to optimize the remaining images. But it quickly became obvious that slideshow settings can get complex and overwhelming to merchants, and the notion of image ratio itself is already a pretty confusing concept to begin with. 

We gathered feedback on different interfaces, and featured different labels in attempt to avoid confusing jargon (adapt to image height, adapt to tallest image, dynamic height, fill slide, fit to slide, landscape and portrait ratios, tall and short images, and on and on). The mental model was often too complex and the live preview in the theme editor didn’t help merchants understand. 

In the end, the solution we settled on doesn’t prevent image cropping in every possible use case, but is the result of an intensive battle between usability and the level of control given to merchants. 

This feature is a slide height setting called adapt to first image.

Shopify slideshow: adapt to first image feature showcase
The adapt to first image feature adapts the slideshow height to the first slide.

Along with our theme updates, we released a corresponding theme help doc that puts a special emphasis on image cropping notions to reduce confusion behind the new feature. 

There are a number of benefits to the adapt to first imageapproach: 

  • It doesn’t require overriding the existing layout. The adapt to first image feature can be added as an extra alternate layout.
  • The setting is relatively self-explanatory and easy to understand.
  • It prevents image cropping on the first slide, on both desktop and mobile (unless it exceeds a maximum or minimum height).
  • It makes it possible to avoid cropping altogether by using the same image ratio on all slides.
  • Reordering slides enables merchants to test different scenarios when different image ratios are involved (as per the example below).
Shopify slideshow: image cropping comparisons
Two use cases of a slideshow with the same images put in different orders, showing how the cropping changes.

Of course, this feature update implies some design changes too. The changes are often more apparent on mobile. 

Because the section height can be considerably reduced when thin landscape images are used, we sometimes moved otherwise overlaid content below the image. This also ensures most of the image won’t be hidden behind headings and buttons, and aligns with the initial problem of attempting to uncover the entire image. 

In cases where the text length varies from one slide to another, the rest of the page below may shift when slides are changing. As long as it stops shifting when the user scrolls down (if auto-rotate is enabled), I would argue that the UX trade-off is reasonable. Let’s not forget this trade-off is still optional too, since we retained the original layouts as options. 

Shopify slideshow: changes in layout on mobile
The change in layout is often more apparent on mobile, as images may appear smaller to allow them to be displayed in full on the vertical screen.

You might also like: A Beginner’s Guide to Sass with Shopify — Part 1: Getting Started With Sass.

2. Image position settings

Reducing the occurrence of image cropping with an alternate layout is great, but we can go a bit further to support merchants when cropping does occur. A new image position feature allows the focal point of images to stay in a relative ‘safe zone’, and the setting applies regardless of the slideshow height option (adaptive or not). Making sure to include this in our theme settings can make a big difference for merchants.

Shopify slideshow: image position feature
The image position feature allows merchants to set the focal point of their images so that it remains visible in the viewport.

We first shipped this update to Debut and our support team noticed a significant decrease in tickets regarding slideshow issues. Our other Shopify-built themes have since been updated too, successfully stress testing the UX pattern in different contexts. 

Slideshow best practices

In addition to addressing the image cutoff issue detailed above, a theme should provide sufficient options to customize its slideshow. Not being able to change the text alignment, for instance, can make certain images unusable. Because a lot of images have their focal point in the center, I believe themes with alternatives to centered text and buttons have an advantage. 

It is not uncommon for me to encounter Shopify stores with text and buttons baked-in into slide images, perhaps as a workaround from lacking such features. This worsens the cropping problem, in addition to encouraging bad practices. We’re hoping to provide merchants with a cohesive experience for storefront customization, and to allow them to build usable and engaging shopping experiences for their customers. 

Here is a list of recommendations to keep in mind when building out or updating slideshows. Nothing below should be too surprising, and the slideshow section in the theme you built might not even require any design update. 

Recommendations:

  • If auto-rotate is supported, allow it to be disabled in theme settings
  • Avoid enabling auto-rotate by default
  • Allow auto-rotation to be paused/resumed by the users
  • Pause rotation on hover, and resume on mouse out
  • Provide theme settings to increase the contrast when text is overlaid on images
  • Provide different section height options
  • Provide image position settings for smarter cropping
  • Provide text alignment options
  • Display slideshow controls (wayfinder and arrows)
  • Support keyboard navigation
  • Avoid video content in slideshows (poor UX and a11y when combined with auto-rotate)
  • Avoid overcrowding small mobile images with overlaid content

You might also like: How to Add a Social Media Marketing Icon to Your Theme.

Make slideshows easier for merchants

This article deliberately refrains from covering other phenomenons associated with slideshows, such the low conversion rate caused by the banner blindness effect, because that’s a whole other topic. At the very least, UX best practices should be considered and balanced in order for this widely used section to not diminish by default the quality of our merchants’ stores.

By using the best practices and implementing the solutions above, you’ll help merchants by building highly customizable, usable slideshow features.

What are your best practices for working with slideshows? Share your thoughts in the comments below.



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unite 2020 update
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An Important Update on Shopify Unite 2020 — Shopify News


Dear Shopify Partners,

Shopify Unite is a special time for all of us. Every year, it’s an opportunity to get together with our global partner community, celebrate our shared success, and discuss our vision for the future of commerce. Unfortunately, this year Shopify Unite will need to take on a new form.

Because of the evolving public health concerns around COVID-19, we’ve made the hard but necessary decision to cancel the in-person element of Unite 2020. For the same reason, we will also postpone Shopify Pursuit, our international conference tour.

We know this decision impacts you and everyone in our global ecosystem, but the health and safety of our partners and employees is our greatest concern. We’re not willing to put anyone at risk by proceeding with our in-person events.

We will refund all tickets, and we ask that you reconsider any travel and accommodations you’ve booked for Shopify Unite or Pursuit. Read more about our refund process on the Unite website.

Even in these difficult circumstances, we’re still fully committed to exploring the future of commerce together, and giving this community advanced access to our product roadmap. In the coming weeks, we’ll share more information about how you can participate in a reimagined Unite, and we’ll announce new dates for Pursuit. Keep an eye on the Shopify Unite and Pursuit homepages for more details.

Our conference is called Unite for a reason, and we’ll remain united from our respective corners of the world. Let’s be creative, friends—share your ideas for virtual ways we can show you all the new, cool things we have coming. We are up for anything! DM me with your thoughts.

Looking forward to seeing you again in person as soon as possible, 

Jean-Michel Lemieux





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Simplified Shopify reporting in your Buffer dashboard
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Simplified Shopify reporting in your Buffer dashboard


One thing we’ve heard over and over is that logging into social media analytics tools can leave marketers feeling a little lost. Sure you can see the reach and engagement of your posts but how is this really impacting your business?

Social media tools have been great at giving us social media metrics. But they terribly lack at providing us with a comprehensive view of the business. Unless you are running social ads, chances are you find it hard to know how your marketing efforts have influenced sales.

For direct-to-consumer (DTC) brands that invest in social media, the need to understand how social media and sales relate to each other is crucial. Marketers at these brands need to know how their social media strategy is helping the business. To them, social media is not just about getting likes and comments…

but how their social media posts are driving the business forward.

That’s why we are thrilled to introduce the first version of our Shopify integration today. You can now have your social and Shopify data in one single tool and create modern, visual reports with more data about your business. 

(Can’t wait to get started? Start an Analyze Premium trial to try the integration right away!)

Realize the full potential of your brand

Our customers use our platform of products to build their brand and connect with their customers online. Analyze, our new analytics product, aims to help you realize the full potential of your brand.

To achieve the best version of your brand, we want to give you:

  • More data to provide a more complete picture of your brand
  • Data that are easy to understand and share
  • Strategies and tactics to achieve your goals

Currently, social media marketing can feel isolated from the business. You spend time creating content, find the best time to post, and respond to questions on your posts. At the end of the day, you can only report on follower growth, reach, and engagement.

Only if you had more data about your marketing efforts and the business!

When we look at 1,300 top DTC brands, we learned that 87.4 percent of them use Shopify to sell their products.

Shopify provides data that marketers and small business owners often lack in social media tools — sales data. We realized it’s a source of data that could give you a more complete picture of your brand:

Social + sales

Simplified Shopify reporting in your Buffer dashboard

“We usually cross reference metrics from Shopify and our social media analytics.”

When we asked our customers how they figure out whether what they are doing on social is worth it, we heard several versions of the quote above. That’s when we realized our customers have a problem we could solve.

With the new Shopify integration, you’ll have your social media and Shopify data in a single place — Analyze. For this first version, we focus on a few key metrics you need and put them in the same dashboard as your social media data.

At the top of your Shopify tab, you can get a quick health check-in on your business. This is built for you to get a sense of your business health at a glance.

One of the metrics you’ll get is your average customer lifetime value. This is an important metric to know because to have a profitable business, you generally want to spend less money on acquiring new customers and retaining them than they spend on your products.

You’ll also get data to help you understand where your sales are coming from and what products are selling well.

Which channel drives the most number of customers or the highest sales?

Which channel brings in the most valuable customers?

Which are my top products, and where are the sales coming from?

This additional data from Shopify in Analyze will give you a better picture of your business than having only social media data.

To make it easier for your reporting, you can add the tables to your reports in Analyze, download them as PDF, and share them with your team. Just like any other tables and charts in Analyze.

Connecting social media and sales

For a long time, marketers have struggled to show the impact of social media on the bottom line. Much of this data is not available in social media tools that marketers use to plan, optimize, and report their campaigns. It just felt off that marketers can plan and measure their social media campaigns in one tool but have to find another, often much more complicated, tool to know that the campaigns are selling products.

Now you can report how much sales your social media marketing strategy has generated for the business — using a single tool.

(These numbers do not include orders from customers who saw your social media posts and went to Google to search for your website and buy products. That is much harder to track right now. But you now know, at the minimum, how much sales came directly from your social media profiles and the actual impact is much higher.)

You no longer need to jump between tools to draw the connection between your social media efforts and your sales.

Hannah Pilpel, social project manager at MADE.COM, discovered that customers from organic social have a higher average order value than the site average. You can now see this for your business, too.

Gain a better understanding of your brand

Having more data and analytics is essential for realizing the full potential of your brand. It gives you insights to act on and improve your marketing campaigns so that you can grow your brand and your business.

This is just the first version of our Shopify integration, and we are keen to explore more ways to make it more valuable to you. For example, here are some of the areas we have been thinking about:

  • Per-post sales: Find out how much sales each social media post has generated
  • Campaign sales: Know how much sales your campaign has generated
  • Customer insights: Learn more about the social media users who are buying your products
  • Customer lifetime value: Calculate customer lifetime value for different segments
  • Product buzz: Get insights into who’s talking about your products on social

For now, with your social media and Shopify data together in Analyze, you can already have a better understanding of your marketing and brand.

Give yourself an advantage today.

Try Analyze for free.





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