The Power of Influencer Marketing  | OMIO PIM powered by Retail Assist
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The Power of Influencer Marketing | OMIO PIM powered by Retail Assist



Is #influencermarketing really all that important and, if so, how can #retailers harness use it to their advantage?

► Read the blog post: https://omio-retail.com/the-power-of-influencer-marketing/

——————
TRANSCRIPT:

Word of mouth sales generate more than twice the sales of paid advertising.

81% of #consumers make a purchase based on friends’ #socialmedia posts.

Conversions are 4-10 times higher from offers shared by trusted advocates.

HOW CAN RETAILERS MAXIMISE ON THIS?
Influencer marketing allows a constant dialogue that is invaluable to retailers. #Instagram opens up a direct conversation with the customer, and, with 130 million people a month tapping on product tags in shopping posts, retailers can immediately find out what consumers are shopping for, the trends they want to invest in and the celebrity styles they’re lusting after.

Retailers can quickly adapt product offerings from commercial success. Expanding their #digitalmarketplace allows retailers to reach consumers wherever they choose to shop. However, more selling platforms means more product data to manage. When an influencer shares a product, retailers need to ensure its visibility across all selling channels. This needs to happen quickly, to maximise sales opportunities.

HOW CAN OMIO PIM HELP?
Our #productinformationmanagement system helps retailers to optimise products across multiple channels; reduce lead times through faster creation of new routes to market; and be the frontrunners for new and evolving shopping channels.

Digital commerce doesn’t need to be complex. Become part of the PIM product evolution. Discover #OMIOPIM today.

https://omio-retail.com/

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SOURCES:
https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/marketing-and-sales/our-insights/a-new-way-to-measure-word-of-mouth-marketing
https://www.socialmediatoday.com/marketing/masroor/2015-05-28/social-media-biggest-influencer-buying-decisions
https://www.retailtouchpoints.com/topics/digital-marketing/use-influencer-marketing-to-connect-your-brand-with-shoppers
https://business.instagram.com/blog/new-to-instagram-shopping-checkout

#omio #pim #retailassist

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The POWER Of Social Media MARKETING In 2020 | Adam Erhart
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The POWER Of Social Media MARKETING In 2020 | Adam Erhart



The POWER Of Social Media MARKETING In 2020 | Adam Erhart
Download Your Free “One Page Marketing Plan”: https://aerh.co/32j1cCI

If you want to discover how to harness the true power of social media then stay tuned.

Because Social media has proven itself as a powerful force with the ability to influence politics, economics, and social issues more than anything we’ve ever seen in history.

It can also help you sell more stuff – and there’s nothing wrong with that

Which is why in this episode I’m going to be showing you where to spend your time, energy, and dollars to get the best results possible with one of the most powerful forces on the face of the planet today – social media.

Let’s dive in!

***Marketing Resources:
Work With Me: https://bit.ly/2FY2vzF
Our Advertising Agency: http://aerh.co/1oVVeEc
Facebook Ad Image Guide : https://bit.ly/2H9EPt9
FAST Content Formula : https://bit.ly/2JEu5kz
60 Second Video Ad Script : https://bit.ly/2GQF0Kl
One Page Marketing Plan : https://bit.ly/2v6HPBp

***Let’s Connect:
Website: http://adamerhart.com
Click here to subscribe on YouTube: https://bit.ly/2HxjQRa
Twitter: http://twitter.com/adamerhart
Facebook: http://facebook.com/officialadamerhart
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adamerhart

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4 Power Plays for Driving Google Traffic (When No One's Looking for You)
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4 Power Plays for Driving Google Traffic (When No One’s Looking for You)


We learned from the 2010 sci-fi classic Inception that it’s nearly impossible to plant an idea in someone’s head (even for professional dream architects).

This is bad news when you’re on the hook to deliver a high-performing landing page for a new product or service. If no one is searching for your offer, then no matter how brilliant your page, it’s much harder to get the traffic you need to validate, test, and scale.

Even Google, the search engine powerhouse, can’t create demand where none existed before.

…Or can it?

SEO and paid search get so much attention, it’s easy to forget that Google’s coverage actually extends far beyond organic and paid SERP listings. 

Not only does Google’s advertising network reach 90% of internet users, but the cost can also be pennies on the dollar compared to other platforms (like social). And by using Google Ads’ advanced targeting options, you can attract the perfect audience to your landing page and offer.

The opportunity to drive targeted, affordable traffic with Google Ads is massive—even if no one is entering your product or service into a search box. Here are four types of Google Ads that will deliver a real bang for your buck.


1. Drive Desire with YouTube Ads

More than a billion people watch over 30 billion hours of YouTube each month. Since Google owns YouTube, you can easily reach a very targeted audience with your video ads.

The Opportunity:

YouTube ads are a great way to drive awareness of your new offer by providing context and visuals in a way that text ads can’t. Targeted ads not only earn views, they can bring new engaged audiences to your landing page, ready to buy.

Here’s a client screenshot of their video campaign performance. With a low average cost per view (CPV) of only $0.05, the $25:1 ROAS absolutely justifies the investment. 

A screenshot of video campaign performance

You have several options for video ads, including bumper, outstream, and video discovery. 

The most popular format is skippable in-stream. These ads are skippable after 5 seconds, and advertisers are only charged if someone engages with the ad, watches to the end, or watches past 30 seconds (whichever comes first).

Examples of YouTube ads

With YouTube Ads, Watch Out For:

The first 5 seconds of your ad are critical for hooking your viewer. If your ad takes too long to tell your story or introduce your brand, your target audience will skip it.

If we’re being honest, though, you probably don’t have a “first 5 seconds” of a video ad to optimize. Creating video ads is expensive and time-consuming. It’s easy to de-prioritize and procrastinate production even if you know “it’s important.”

Fortunately, you don’t need a million-dollar ad to grab your audience’s attention. 

The video software company Wistia tested the impact of production budgets on performance by creating 3 ads at dramatically different costs ($100K, $10K, $1K). They found that a big-budget ad can actually backfire by feeling too polished.

So, remember, the best ads are those that connect with the audience, and that can be done on almost any budget.

Get Started with YouTube Ads:

To run YouTube ads, select the Video campaign type in Google Ads.

Select campaign type: video

Your videos will need to be hosted on YouTube. You can use unlisted videos, but they can’t be private. You can find complete instructions for launching YouTube Ads here

Keep in mind that even if your videos are just halfway-decent, they’ll do more to grow awareness than not running videos at all.

Editor’s note. Amy focuses on using video to drive visitors who aren’t aware of your product or service to your landing pages, but you might also consider targetting people who’re already actively searching (if you’re not already). Joe Martinez has some killer advice on how to use custom intent audiences. Worth a read if video is your thing!

2. Be Newsworthy with Discovery Ads

Discovery campaigns are Google Ads’ newest campaign type (and the unofficial competition to Facebook’s feed).

The Opportunity:

Until recently, social media channels had somewhat of a lock on serving hyper-targeted ads directly in a user’s news feed. But Google’s ramping up its options, and its Discover feed serves content to 800 million users based on their interests.

You can reach targeted users as they consume personalized content on Discover, YouTube, and Gmail with Discovery ads, featuring your product alongside other curated topics based on rich signals (such as web activity and location).

A comparison between feeds

With Discovery Ads, Watch Out For:

Machine learning attempts to serve the right ad to the right user at the right time, but that doesn’t mean you can be “hands off.”

Notice the ads above. I was served a discovery ad for a Business Analytics degree around the time I was researching MBA programs, so this ad feels very relevant to my interests.

The laundry ad, however, is a definite miss (punctuation mistake included). The promoted laundromat is 30 miles from where I live; so, even if I were “in-market” for a laundromat (which I’m not), the distance would be a deal breaker. 

Google gives you the tools to reach your ideal market, but it won’t tell you that your geography is wrong or that your targeting is too broad. This is true for all ad formats, but it’s a needed reminder when Google suggests its internal signals will do the heavy lifting of targeting.

Get Started with Discovery Ads:

Because Discovery ads are still in Beta, your first step is to work with your Google rep to get whitelisted. These ads also have their own campaign type, so select Discovery. 

Campaign type: Discovery

Follow these instructions for Discovery campaigns. Avoid ad disapproval by paying close attention to the image requirements, which are slightly different than they are for other ad types on Google Ads.


3. Get Email Opens (with No List) Using Gmail Ads

You don’t need a big list (or any list at all) to send targeted email promotions with high open rates.

The Opportunity:

With more than 1.5 billion active users worldwide, Gmail is one of the most popular websites in the United States. You can reach your target readers at the top of their inbox and only pay when they open your ad, which expands like regular email.

An example of Gmail Ads

While you can no longer target keywords within Gmail content, you can still use “audience keywords” and many other personalized targeting options to capture your ideal audience’s attention and direct them to your landing page.

With Gmail Ads, Watch Out For:

When ads are served in Gmail, you’re charged for the click that opens the email to expand your message, not the click that drives to your landing page (those clicks are free). This can be very confusing to marketers!

Also, be aware that only free Gmail accounts receive Gmail Ads: if you’re primarily targeting B2B clients using the paid G suite (or non-Google email) accounts, you may want to skip this method.

Get Started With Gmail Ads:

You don’t need to set up a dedicated campaign to run Gmail ads. Discovery ads (above) and Responsive Display ads (below) both automatically give you coverage in Gmail inboxes.

If you’d like more control over the way Gmail ads run, including using custom HTML files, you can do that by creating a dedicated Gmail campaign after you select Display.

Campaign subtype: Gmail campaign

Remember that you’re writing for an inbox, so write a headline that feels like a subject line, not a headline. “Grocery delivery on your schedule” works. “Packed with protein” doesn’t.

4. Amplify Your Offer with Responsive Display Ads

Responsive display ads are the default ad type for the Google Display Network. They let you easily create ads that can meet the publisher specs of the 2 million sites included in the network.

The Opportunity:

With Google’s automated responsive display ads, you can input multiple assets for a single ad (15 images, 5 logos, 5 videos, 5 headlines, and 5 descriptions). 

Google will adjust and optimize the size, appearance, and format of the ad to fit the available inventory on the publisher site, meaning you don’t have to create multiple ad sizes of each creative variant.

Here are examples of how a responsive display image ad, text ad, and native ad can look on a mobile device:

Comparison of image, text, and native ads

With Responsive Display Ads, Watch Out For:

If you’re like most advertisers, you don’t think the pure text ad (shown above in the center) is great for branding. Unfortunately, there’s no way to opt out of that or any other ad combination using RDAs.

If you need full branding control for your ads, image ads would be a better choice. They’re more work to set up but allow you to ensure brand guideline compliance.

Get Started With Responsive Display Ads

Responsive display ads are easy to create. Select the Display campaign type and follow these instructions to set up responsive display ads.

Campaign Type: Display ad

With responsive ads, you’ll have one URL for any headline-image-description combination, so use assets that can work interchangeably. 


Keep Bad Traffic Off Your Landing Page

Now that you know the types of Google Ads you can use to grow awareness and interest for your offer, let’s review how to make sure you get the right traffic.

The best ads and landing pages won’t drive conversions if you’re reaching the wrong audiences. Worse yet, unqualified traffic will skew your conversion rates and make it harder to improve your landing page. 

You can layer audience and content targeting to reach new relevant audiences with precision, including:

  • Demographics
  • Affinity
  • In-market
  • Custom intent
  • Topics
  • Placement
  • Content keywords 
  • Display expansion

Refine your targeting strategy, so you don’t waste budget or capture the wrong audiences.

As we saw in the laundromat example, just because someone is in your county doesn’t mean they want to drive an hour for your coin-op laundry service.

But tighten the geography to a 5-mile radius, and serve ads to people who are actually in-market for laundromats, visiting the websites of your competitors, or researching how to fix a broken washer/dryer… and suddenly you’ve got some viable targeting.

Enjoy the Fruits of Early-Funnel Google Ads

Ads targeted to the right audience at the right time can create awareness where none existed before. This ultimately drives organic searches, builds effective remarketing lists, and creates a new audience to reach.

Smart paid marketing not only solves the problem of generating landing page traffic, it also closes the loop on our inception problem, planting the seeds of future loyal audiences.

Landing pages with PPC



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The Power of "Is": A Featured Snippet Case Study
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The Power of “Is”: A Featured Snippet Case Study


I’m not a literary scholar, but I believe it was Hamlet that said “to have a featured snippet or not to have a featured snippet?” Ever since featured snippets came onto the scene, sites have been trying to secure them.

My team and I wanted in on this craze. Throughout our journey of research, testing, failure, and success, we found some interesting pieces of information that we wanted to share with the community. I’ll walk you through what we did and show you some of our results (though can’t share traffic numbers).

It was Britney Muller’s webinar on Feature Snippet Essentials and the release of the featured snippets cheat sheet that inspired me to capture what we’ve learned.

What are featured snippets?

A featured snippet is the box that appears at the top of the search result page that provides information to succinctly and accurately answer your query and cites a website.

Why are featured snippets important?

A featured snippet is important because it represents an additional SERP feature that you can secure. Usually located at the very top of the results page, featured snippets offer you greater visibility to searchers and can boost brand recognition.

Our featured snippet plan of attack

  1. Research, research, and more research on how to pull this off
  2. Identify keywords we wanted to target
  3. Change how we structured our on-page content
  4. Measure, test, and repeat the process

1. Research, research, and more research

We spent a great deal of time researching featured snippets. We looked at different ways to find featured snippet opportunities and researched how to optimize our content for them. We also went and saw Kellie Gibson speak on featured snippets volatility.

Did we implement everything from what we learned during this discovery phase into our featured snippet strategy? No. Are we perfect at it now after a year and a half of practicing this? No, no, no. We are getting better at it, though.

2. Identify keywords we wanted to target

We originally started out focusing on big “head” keywords. These represented terms that had indeterminate searcher intent. The first head term that we focused on was HRIS. It stands for Human Resources Information System — sexy, right?

Note: Looking back on this, I wish we had focused on longer tail keywords when testing out this strategy. It’s possible we could have refined our process faster focusing on long tail keywords instead of the large head terms.

3. Change how we structure our on-page content

We worked closely with our writing team to update how we lay out content on our blog. We changed how we used H2s, H3s (we actually used them now!), lists, and so on to help make our content easier to read for both users and robots.

In most of the content where we’re trying to rank for a featured snippet, we have an H2 in the form of a question. Immediately after the H2, we try and answer that question. We’ve found this to be highly successful (see pictures later on in the post). I wish I could say that we learned this tactic on our first try, but it took several months before this dawned on us.

4. Measure, test, and repeat

The first blog post that we tried this out on was our “What is an HRIS” article. Overall, this post was a success, it ranked for the head term that we were going for (HRIS), but we didn’t win a featured snippet. We deemed it a slight failure and went back to work.

This is where the fun started.

Featured snippet successes

We discovered a featured snippet trigger that we could capitalize on — mainly by accident. What was it?

Is.

Really. That was it. Just by adding that to some of our content, we started to pick up featured snippets. We started to do it more and more, and we were winning more and more featured snippets! I believe it was this strategic HR example that clued us onto the “is” trigger.

So we kept it up.

Featured snippet won for "employee orientation"
Featured snippet won for "hr business partner"
Featured snippet won for "employee development plan"

What did we learn?

I want to preface this by saying that all of this is anecdotal evidence. We haven’t looked at several million URLs, run it through any fancy number-crunching, or had a statistician look at the data. These are just a few examples that we’ve noticed that, when repeated, have worked for us.

  1. Blog/HR glossary – We found that it was easier for us to gain featured snippets from our blog or our glossary pages. It seemed like no matter what optimizations that we made on the product page, we weren’t able to make it happen.
  2. Is – No, not the clown from the Stephen King novel. “Is” seemed to be the big trigger word for winning featured snippets. During our audit, we did find some examples of list featured snippets, but the majority were paragraphs and the trigger word was “is.”
  3. Definitions – We saw that definitions of the head term we were trying to go for was usually what got the definition. Our on-page copy would have the H2 with the keyword (e.g. What is Employee Orientation?) and then the paragraph copy would answer that question.
  4. Updating old posts – One surprising thing we learned is that when we went back to old posts and tried adding the “is” trigger word, we didn’t see a change — even if we added a good amount of new content to the page. We were only able to grab featured snippets with new content that we created. Also, when we updated large amounts of content on a few pages that had featured snippets, we lost them. We made sure to not touch the sections of the page that the snippet was pulling from, but we still lost the snippet (some have come back, but some are still gone).

Conclusion

A few final things to note:

  1. First, while these examples are anecdotal, I think that they show some practices that anyone wanting to capture featured snippets can do. 
  2. Second, this was process was over a 12–18 month period and we’re still evolving what we think is the best way for us and our content team. 
  3. Third, we had a lot of failures with this. I showed you one example, but we’ve had many (short-form content, long-form content, glossary terms, blog posts, etc.) that didn’t work. We just kept measuring, testing, and optimizing. 
  4. Lastly, I need to give a shout out to our writing team. We massively disrupted their process with this and they have been phenomenal to work with (effective interdepartmental relationships are crucial for any SEO project).

Let me know what’s worked for you or if you have any questions by leaving a comment down below.

Note: On January 23, 2020 Google announced that featured snippets would no longer be listed twice on the first page. For more information, you can check out this thread from Google Search Liaison. This may change how valuable featured snippets are to companies and the amount of clicks a listing gets. Before you start to panic, remember it will be important to watch and measure how this affects your site before doing anything drastic. If you do decide to go nuclear and to remove your featured snippets from the results, check out this documentation.





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Pondering the Power of Disruption and Risk in Content Marketing [The Weekly Wrap]
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Pondering the Power of Disruption and Risk in Content Marketing [The Weekly Wrap]




Pondering the Power of Disruption and Risk in Content Marketing [The Weekly Wrap]










































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